Monday, May 30, 2011

St. Margaret Mary Mosaic

Today's mosaic is actually background--but lovely background. It simulates the heavenly light from the crucifix at St. Margaret Mary Alocoque Catholic Church in Lomita. (The "Alacoque" is often omitted.)  Here's two views to give you the full effect. I suspect the garlands and drapes are part of the church's Easter decorations and will disappear shortly. Or not.


It all makes for a very pretty and festive presentation

I think that I shall never see
A cosier communitee.

Actually, St. Margaret Mary's is one of the loveliest and most inviting churches I've been to. There's a school next door, so the grounds are pretty large and dotted with well-planned rose bushes, trees, and a few alcoves with saint statues.

This particular tree between the church (on the left) and another building was draped in sweet-smelling jasmine. I'm sure that's a mood-changer for everyone who passes underneath.

The present church opened in 1954 on Easter Sunday and it held 800 people under its 40-ft ceiling. The parish itself, hoswever, has existed since the late 1930s.

It's been renovated a few times, most recently in 2001. That renovation was four times the inital cost of building the church: $800,000. Over the 2001 summer, while work was done on the church, mass was celebrated under a big white tent in the parking lot.

I suspect the mosaic dates from then (early references say a red curtain hung there previously) but I can't confirm that.

I didn't know this, but the church started the Lomita Fair, a big annual event that brings people from all over South Bay each September.

4 comments:

Christina Brehove said...

As a parishioner of Saint Margaret Mary, I can tell you that the mosaic background has been there since before the 2001 remodel. :)

Christina Brehove said...

As a parishioner of Saint Margaret Mary, I can tell you that the mosaic background has been there since before the 2001 remodel. :)

Vix said...

Thanks so much for stopping by and letting us know.
Mosaic styles change so slowly, so it's difficult for a non-artist like me to guess at a date.

Anonymous said...

When I was a student there in the 1950s and early 60s, the red curtain was what was there. It's nice to see what's been done since.